What is Aged Garlic?

 

Kyolic® odorless Aged Garlic Extract is truly the only odorless garlic supplement. The exclusive aging process eliminates garlic odor and harsh side effects. Moreover, Kyolic® contains various antioxidant properties and is the only antioxidant garlic supplement available. Kyolic is also standardized with SAC (S-Allyl Cysteine), a beneficial water-soluble sulphur containing compound which is characteristic of Aged Garlic Extract.

Kyolic® maintains all the healthful benefits and nutritional value of the whole, raw, organic garlic from which it is made, but is not irritating to the digestive tract tissues, avoiding the stomach upset, gas and diarrhea that may accompany non-Kyolic garlic consumption.

For years, allicin has been deemed as the compound responsible for the benefits of garlic. It has shown an ability to kill bacteria and fungus in test tubes and topically crushed raw garlic has been used in wars to fight infections. However, no clinical trials have been performed with allicin and it has not become a commercial product, mainly because of its chemical instability but also because of its pungent odor and irritating nature. Allicin is produced by an enzymatic reaction when raw garlic is either crushed or somehow injured. The enzyme, alliinase, combines with a compound called alliin in raw garlic and produces allicin. Because allicin is so unstable, once it is generated it readily changes into other compounds. Thus cooking, aging, crushing and otherwise processing garlic causes the allicin to be decomposed into other compounds. According to two studies of garlic preparations, allicin decreased to nondetectable amounts within one to six days (20-144 hours). This could explain why a study of various products on the market showed that they all contained an undetectable amount (<1 ppm) of allicin. For more information on this issue please visit www.allicin.com.

Since the development of Kyolic® more than four decades ago, Aged Garlic Extract has attracted the attention of the world's most promising researchers. A wide range of research and clinical studies, confirming the superiority of Kyolic® over bargain brands, have been conducted by various research institutes worldwide. Over 100 studies on Aged Garlic Extract preparations have been presented at various symposiums, including the First world Congress on Garlic in 1990, Designer Food III Symposium, 1994, and published in various scientific journals. Kyolic® is also covered by more than a dozen patents and patents pending worldwide.

 

What is KYOLIC good for?

 
 

Will KYOLIC lower my cholesterol?

 
 

Will KYOLIC lower my blood pressure?

 
 

How much KYOLIC is equal one to one clove of garlic?

 
 

How can KYOLIC be effective without odor?

 
 

Can I take KYOLIC if I am allergic to sulfa drugs, or sulfite?

 
 

What is the difference between garlic supplements?

 

The garlic supplements available on the market can be placed into the following four categories:

1) Garlic oil
2) Garlic powder
3) Garlic oil macerates
4) Aged garlic extract

1) GARLIC OIL:
• Made by distilling crushed garlic; the resulting condensed oils are then mixed with vegetable oil and packaged in soft gel capsules.
• Contains only a minimal amount of garlic essential oil due to its high cost and pungency, the rest being approximately 99% vegetable oil.
• Contains only the oil-soluble compounds found in garlic which are the most potent sources of garlic odor.
• Lacks beneficial water-soluble compounds.


2) GARLIC POWDER:
• Dehydrated and pulverized garlic.
• Typically tableted or encapsulated with parsley, mint or citrus or sugar-coated to decrease odor.
• Chemically very similar to common, inexpensive garlic flavoring/spice powders/condiments.
• Allicin content is often emphasized in these products, however various garlic products tested contained no allicin due to the instability of allicin.
• Some claim to have "allicin potential, however, simulated digestive conditions significantly reduce allicin production and absorption of allicin into the body has not been proven.
• If high heat is used in the process of making these powders, most of the beneficial compounds and natural enzymes in garlic are destroyed.


3) GARLIC OIL MACERATE:
• Designed originally for use as a condiment.
• Consists of garlic cloves or garlic powder mixed into vegetable oil and then encapsulated.
• Contains odorous oil-soluble compounds as well as small amounts of water soluble compounds.
• Typically poorly standardized for ingredients.

4) AGED GARLIC EXTRACT:
• Made from organically grown garlic which is crushed and then naturally cold-aged for up to 20 months converting harsh, odorous and irritating compounds into compounds which are safe, stable and odorless.
• Kyolic is gentler on the intestinal tract than other forms of garlic and its constituents may even enhance the growth of beneficial bacteria.
• Standardized for s-allyl cysteine which is stable, odorless, safe, and has been proven to be absorbed and utilized by the body (s-allyl cysteine has demonstrated various benefits in studies such as reducing cholesterol synthesis in liver cells, enhancing the activity of cells in the body which fight infections, and reducing the growth of tumors in animals)
• More than four decades of usage in both japan and the united states.
• Boasts of more than 100 studies published in scientific journals confirming the safety and effectiveness of both it and the ingredients it contains.
• Does not have the offensive aroma of raw garlic or other forms of garlic. It is known as the "sociable garlic".
• Kyolic's garlic is all natural and is organically grown without pesticides or herbicides

 

What is the maximum suggested intake for KYOLIC?

 
 

Where and how is our garlic grown?

 
 

Does KYOLIC produce any adverse effects?

 
 

Dosage for children?

 
 

Expiration/shelf life of Kyolic?

 
 

What is allicin?

 
 

Does KYOLIC contain allicin?

 
 

How stable is allicin?

 
 

What is allicin potential?

 

Though garlic products do not appear to contain a significant amount of allicin, some products contain both a compound (alliin) and an enzyme (alliinase) which can generate allicin when added to water, so-called "allicin potential" or "allicin yield.” However, this may be of questionable value for the following reasons:

1. Realistic conditions such as exposure to stomach acid and intestinal fluids as would occur when one consumes a garlic product interfere with the production of allicin, significantly decreasing the amount that can be produced.11,12
2. No clinical studies have been conducted using allicin alone.
3. Allicin is not bioavailable. No allicin was detected in the urine or blood up to 24 hours following the consumption of approximately 90,000 mcg derived from 25 g of crushed raw garlic cloves.13

Allicin is a highly unstable, harsh, and odorous compound generated from fresh raw garlic. An enzyme, alliinase, combines with a compound called alliin in the raw garlic to generate allicin when the raw garlic is crushed. However, because allicin is so unstable, when garlic is cooked, processed in any way, tableted and/or aged as our product is, the allicin is decomposed into other compounds. From various studies, it is apparent that neither odor nor allicin is necessary to obtain the benefits of garlic. Further, absorption of allicin by the body has not been proven.

KYOLIC® Aged Garlic Extract™, as the name implies, is cold-aged for up to 20 months. Therefore, it does not contain allicin. KYOLIC's aging process was uniquely designed to naturally convert harsh substances in raw garlic, such as allicin, into a cascade of gentle but beneficial, odorless compounds. Even though KYOLIC contains no allicin, many of its beneficial effects have been confirmed by peer-reviewed scientific journal.

 

References:

 

1. Lau, B.H.S., Lam, F. and Wang-Cheng, R. 1987. Effects of an odor-modified garlic preparation on blood lipids. Nutr. Res. 7: 139-149.

2. Steiner, M., Kham, A.H., Holbert, D., Lin, R.I.S. 1996. A double-blind crossover study in moderately hypercholesteremic men that compared the effect of aged garlic extract and placebo administration on blood lipids. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 64: 866-870.

3. Yeh, Y.Y., Lin, R.I.S and Yeh, S.H. 1995. Cholesterol lowering effects of aged garlic extract supplementation on free-living hypocholesterolemic men consuming habitual diets. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 14(5):545. (abs. #83).

4. Nagai, K. and Matsunaka, J. Effects of Aged Garlic Extract on Blood Pressure in Rats. Yakuri To Chityo (Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics) 3:255-260, 1975.

5. Steiner, M., Kham, A.H., Holbert, D., Lin, R.I.S. 1996. A double-blind crossover study in moderately hypercholesteremic men that compared the effect of aged garlic extract and placebo administration on blood lipids. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 64: 866-870.

6. Cavallito, C.J. and Bailey J.H. Allicin, the Antibacterial Principle of Allium sativum. I. Isolation, Physical Properties and Antibacterial Action. J. American Chem. Soc. 66:1950, 1944.

7. Block, E. The organosulfur chemistry of the genus allium implications for the organic chemistry of sulfur. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 31: 1135-1178, 1992.

8. Brodnitz, M.H. Pascale, J.V., and Derslice, L.V. Flavor Components of Garlic Extract. J. Agric. Food. Chem. 19(2):273-275, 1971.

9. Yu. T-H, and Wu, C-M. Stability of Allicin in Garlic Juice. Journal of Food Science 54(4): 977-981, 1989.

10. Freeman, F. and Kodera, Y. 1995. Garlic chemistry: stability of s-(2-propenyl)-2-propene-1-sulfinothioate (allicin) in blood, solvents, and simulated physiological fluids. J. Agric. Food Chem. 43: 2332-2338.

11. Freeman, F. and Kodera, Y. Garlic chemistry: stability of s-(2-propenyl)-2-propene-1-sulfinothioate (allicin) in blood, solvents, and simulated physiological fluids. J. Agric. Food Chem. 43: 2332-2338, 1995.

12. Lawson L.D. and Hughes B.G. Characterization of the Formation of Allicin and Other Thiosulfinates from Garlic. Planta Medica, 58: 345-350, 1992.

13. Lawson L,D., Ransom D.K. and Hughes B,G. lnhibition of Whole Blood Platelet-Aggregation by Compounds in Garlic Clove Extracts and Commercial Garlic Products, Thrombosis Research, 65: 141-156, 1992.